Why Get Married Past 50? Hear What Not-So-Blushing Brides Say

I frequently say that living with a man means stepping over dirty laundry and giving up all rights to the remote control.  It’s one thing to do that when you’re young and innocent, and quite another when you’re old enough to know better.

My friend was Morene was 59 when she decided to marry her long-time boyfriend Barry. She didn’t do it for financial security or health insurance, she had always been an independent career woman.  Morene simply felt that marriage was part of being a real grown-up.

“Plus, I’d always have a date on Saturday night.”

Pam, at 68, had been a widow for 10 years when Ed, a widower, swept her off her feet.  They were married just 15 months after meeting on a blind date.

“I would have been happy to live together, but Ed wanted to be married for the sake of the children.”

Grandchildren can also be a consideration.

When Pam told her youngest she planned to get married again, he hesitated for a moment, then asked, “Will I have to change my name?”

Getting married after 50, is not the same as getting married at 20 or even 30, and requires a few new rules.

What to Wear:

White’s OK, but please no long gowns with trains and veils.  And, for the love of God, no wrinkled cleavage.

Gift Registry:

Gifting the bride and groom stems from the notion of helping them set up a first household. You and your groom probably need to pare down rather than increase a stockpile of toasters, dishes and crockpots.   And I HATE the idea of asking friends to contribute to a honeymoon fund.

Bridal Party:

If there’re children from a previous marriage, it’s lovely to have them stand up for you.  And these days it’s perfectly acceptable to have groom’s women and bride’s men.

Reception:

No rules here.  You have my permission to host as lavish or modest a reception as you wish.

Marriage over 50 was the right choice for Morene and Pam.  How about you?   I’d like to hear from those of you who prefer to stay single.

 

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By |2017-12-26T22:52:11+00:00December 26th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

About the Author:

A former marketing executive, Judi Schindler, is a past president and founding member of the Chicago Area Chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners. She is a member of the Leadership Team of Engaging Speakers and the Advisory Board of the Chicago College of Performing Arts at Roosevelt University. She’s listed in “Who’s Who in America,” “Who’s Who in American Women” and “Who’s Who in the Midwest.” Follow on Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Subscribe to “The Toilet Seat Must Go Down!”

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